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tips

I can’t believe we are already a month into this semester!  Spring semesters always seem to fly by!  This is around the time people start losing motivation and lack on the skills they need to succeed.  So here are some tips to keep you on track this semester!

  1. Make time for yourself! Sure, homework is important but every one needs a break from school work.  Take some time to step away from school and go on a walk, call your parents, or watch some Netflix to give your brain a break.
  2. Connect with your professors! Now I’m not saying go to their office every single day but, I know many professors that genuinely like to get to know their students.  Once they connect your face with your name it will be a lot easier for the both of you and you may even use them in the future for a letter of recommendation!
  3. Slow down and actually understand what you’re learning!  I’ve been there when I am just trying to get the homework done and not really understanding the answers.  However, that will hurt you once the test comes.  Instead, make time to actually do your homework and read the book if you need to.  What I found that helps me is teaching others what I am learning.
  4. Eat healthy!  Yeah that ice cream or Snickers bar may look delicious but try cutting junk food out of your diet especially during late nights.  Instead, reach for a handful of almonds or grapes.  You will be able to focus more and it will actually satisfy your hunger and keep you full!
  5. Take advantage of planners and sticky notes! I use my planner all the time to keep track of assignments and due dates.  It is a nice place to see everything that is coming up for the semester.  I definitely recommend you getting one!

Best of luck this semester!!

-Courtney

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Getting back to Fontbonne Fonties! It has been a cold start to this Spring Semester. With the fourth week of school in motion, this semester is already flying. After this week, we  will be 1/4 of the way done with the semester . . . crazy!

I have a few tips for getting back into the swing of things and making this semester a great one!

  1. Start early. With cold, bitter, rainy (and hopefully) snowy days upon us, use your time to stay up on your assignments.img_1276
  2. Get ahead! While it is gross outside and you can’t be as adventurous, get ahead on assignments so you can enjoy the beautiful spring weather when it decides to show up.img_1278
  3. Find a study space. Find a place where you can study and are without distractions. Having a designated space for homework will help you concentrate and be productive.img_1279
  4. Take a break! Check out a softball, baseball, basketball, or lacrosse game as they make their way to campus this spring. Take a break from working so hard to cheer on your favorite Griffins.

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These are just a few tips to help you kickstart your semester into high gear. Remember we are 1/4 of the way done with Spring 17 and let the countdown to Spring Break begin!!

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xoxo,

Claire

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Beefy

by Jacey on January 30, 2017

in Academics

Quote

“When I was in high school, they used the word ‘beefy’ to describe someone who was muscular or really built. I’ve never heard it used in the way you’re using it,” my dad told me as I ranted about my classes for the spring semester. ‘Beefy’ is how my Language Disorders teacher portrays our text book. ‘Beefy’ is how the graduate students summarize three of the five classes I’m taking this semester. ‘Beefy’ is how my roommate, current undergrad speech-language pathologist (SLP) student, & alumni of our soccer team described my schedule to our soccer coach. So, with no accurate dictionary (or urban dictionary, for that matter) definition of the term ‘beefy,’ I’ve decided to explain the word to the best of my ability, using the context it’s been repeated in within the first few weeks of my semester.

When I first heard the word, I smirked at it. What a silly word. Beefy. Why can’t they just say “information-filled” or “educating?” I’ll tell ya why. They’re SLP students (and educators) with a wide vocabulary that like to play with words and their meanings and sounds. They have to be ready to explain anything in the most understanding way possible to any age. So here we are with… BEEFY.

I can understand, now, why it’s used to describe our Language Disorders text book. I just started the 4th chapter today and just took my first exam on the first 3 chapters (almost 100 pages, mind you) Thursday. Talk about an overwhelming abundance of information. Not only is the print on each page minuscule, but the information given in each PARAGRAPH is like taking in an explanation of how the earth was made. (Okay, not literally, but it’s a lot of information in a little amount of space). Each chapter is about 25-45 pages long. Your first question is probably “Do you actually read every word on every page?” Yup… I really do. Now you’re probably wondering “Your dramatic description of the book makes that seem impossible…” Although my description may be a little dramatic, I get the job done. Reading that many pages of any TEXT book is going to seem overwhelming and boring. With this text book, especially, I would not recommend sitting down and reading all 25-45 pages in one sitting. It takes me about 30 minutes just to read 6 pages (that’s not an exaggeration, I’ve actually timed myself before). So, prior to reading each chapter, I break it up. I only read 10-12 pages a day. This helps me digest the wealth of information I’m reading while also giving my brain and eyes a break! So, when one of you SLP students is sitting in Dr. O’Hara’s class & you get to hold “the Bible” as this text book has been referred to, don’t freak out. The hour and fifteen minute lectures will fly by, but when you get out of class & begin reading the text book, slowwww iiiitttt doooowwwn. Make the time to take things at your pace and digest all the details, statistics, & facts you’ve been learning about. (Helpful hint: BUY the text book.. DON’T rent it… it really is “the Bible.” DO read the chapters. DO the essay questions she gives you at the end of each chapter. And finally… BREAAATHE).

Now, my class schedule. Because I am a transfer student, my classes for my major (which, by the way, is speech-language pathology), are all kind of stacked on top of one another. Where other undergraduate students have to take the same classes, they are also spreading them out more than I am because they’re also taking care of their gen. ed courses. I got all, but one, of those out of the way in my first two years at a community college. So, as previously stated… my schedule is a little BEEFY. I’m taking speech science, fluency, language disorders, learning diversity, & physical science (there’s that one gen. ed). According to the graduate students I recently spoke with during a tutoring session (10/10 recommend taking advantage of the tutoring opportunities!!!!), the first three listed are some “beefy” classes. The roommate, current SLP undergrad student, & alum of the soccer team I was referring to earlier couldn’t believe I was taking all three of those classes in the same semester. All I really have to say about it right now is thank God it’s not soccer season. Fitting workouts into my schedule is manageable, but if I was having to miss classes for games, I would probably fall way behind, pull my hair out, & move half way across the country. (Kidding! I’d find a way to make it work). I hate missing class and this semester, I cannot afford to! So far, mind you we’re only a month into the semester, fluency and language disorders have been the “beefiest.” (There she goes being an SLP student, playing with words and adding morphemes where they don’t even make sense). There’s a lot of reading in those classes… granted fluency is a much easier read than language disorders, but still – reading is reading! It’s not so much the reading that is stressful, it’s comprehending what you’re reading that makes things a little strenuous. I take notes while reading fluency because we have pop quizzes on the chapters. This way, I have something to review and refresh my memory before class begins so I have an idea of what we may be quizzed over. I don’t take notes while reading my language disorders text. I underline things and also read the questions in the back of the book and write in the margins of each page where the answer can be found so that I’m prepared when she gives us the questions she wants us to know. It’s very helpful because then you don’t have to skim over page after page looking for an answer. You’ve already read it and found where it’s at! (And since you BOUGHT “the Bible,” you can write in it! … see how that works?) As for speech science, make notecards over every bullet point on every slide! I make notecards after every class. (Fun fact, you also have pop quizzes in there – be prepared!)

So… beefy. Beefy can take on a multiple of meanings from what I’ve gathered. For one, it means I’m busy. I’ve got a lot of meat on my plate (ha ha). I’ve always got something I should be or need to be doing. Whether it’s reading a text book or making notecards. I am never bored because of this… HA. Beefy also means informative, educating, detailed, enlightening… all that. Hence why “the Bible” is beefy. It’s like the book that you think is never going to end – and it may not, I haven’t gotten that far yet. The point of all this is, beefy can be an intimidating term when used in the contexts I’ve heard it used in lately. But it’s also a reason to work hard. Some semesters, students may find more difficult than others, and they are and they will continue to be. However, it’s not impossible. Mix in some time management skills, determination, study dates, & a couple naps with beefy & you’re nearly vegetarian!

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Happy Thanksgiving Everyone! I hope everyone is having a great day with their friends and families. Unfortunately, I did not get to leave campus to go home this year for break, but that’s okay because I’ve found several ways to still have an awesome Thanksgiving! I know I’m not the only one who stayed here for the holiday, and I just want share some tips for having a fun break even if you don’t get to leave.

Take everyone up on offers for Thanksgiving dinner– Once all my St. Louis native friends found out that I would be staying on campus today, they all felt sorry for me and invited me to their family’s Thanksgiving dinners. I got at least 5 invites, so I basically have an entire day of eating lined up, which I am pumped about. It’s also fun to hang out with other people’s families and see how they interact. If someone offers you a totally free meal and the opportunity to hang out with them and their crazy/fun family, take them up on it! You still get to eat, and you’re not sitting in your room alone feeling sorry for yourself that you’re not home.

Find other people stranded on campus and hang out- Even though campus is mostly deserted (and a little bit creepy quiet honestly) you are not the only one around. There are always about 15-20 students who stay over breaks. Find them and do something! You can bond over your mutual boredom. It’s a great opportunity to make friends, and what else do you have to do on this quiet campus anyway?

Do your laundry- I know, I know. This sounds like a super boring tip, but we all know the struggle of 150 students trying to share 4 washers/dryers per building. Now is your moment where no one has left their gross clothes in the washer for the past 3 hours, and you reallyyyy need clean underwear, so you have to hurriedly take them out and put your clothes in before they get back and catch you in the act and get all mad that you’re touching their stuff. Been there. Avoid that now and do laundry while no no one is here.

Stay off of social media- The fear of missing out is so real when you’re sitting on your empty campus and your siblings and cousins keep sending you hilarious snap chats of Thanksgiving dinner back home. Ignore them for now, and find other things to do to entertain/distract yourself. It’s easy to feel sad and miserable when you’re comparing your day to the glamorized version’s of everyone else’s on social media. Remember that most of those posts are fake, and nobody is ever having as much fun on their snap chat stories as they want the world to think. Also, don’t forget to feel #blessed that the one perk of not being home for dinner is getting to dodge awkward and inappropriate questions from extended family members about your personal and or/romantic life. Bet you never see those on your sister’s Snapchat.

Happy Holidays, Fontbonne! Enjoy your break, and I’ll see you all when you get back!

Taylor

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Life of a Commuter

by Courtney November 21, 2016

When transferring to Fontbonne last semester, I wasn’t sure how I would like driving to campus everyday.  At my past college I lived in a dorm and was right on campus so it was easy to go to class or stay at the library until late.  However, being a commuter at Fontbonne is great!  Here […]

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Life as a Commuter

by Anna November 21, 2016

If you’ve read some of my past posts, you probably know I’m a commuter.  Overall, this is the best possible way for me to get an exceptional higher education experience and maintain the lifestyle I’m used to at home.  My commute ranges from 35 to 45 minutes one way, depending on traffic, but I enjoy […]

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Top 5 Motivation Tips

by Taylor October 20, 2016

Hey everyone! As of this week, 2nd 8 week classes have started, it looks like we are safely halfway through the semester. This is about the time every semester that my motivation begins to fade a little bit, and I find the enthusiasm that I had at the start of school to be almost nonexistent. […]

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Advice to Pre-Fontbonne Me

by Alumni Posts May 9, 2016

If I could give any advice to the pre-Fontbonne me I would definitely tell her to not stress so much.  Understand that you cannot be in control of absolutely everything in life.  I would also tell myself that I was going to end up a planner and that was going to be tough for me […]

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advice to my pre-Fontbonne self

by Patricia April 28, 2016

The most important thing anyone should know in college is to plan your career junior year! You should start looking at internships before than, but definitely take the time during Junior year to figure out what you want to do. If you wait until Senior year, it may be too late. For example, I am […]

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Advice to Pre-Fontbonne Me (and You!)

by Claire April 27, 2016

Dear younger Claire (and incoming freshman), Thinking back just 9 months ago before I started school at Fontbonne, I expected something totally different. I excepted teachers that didn’t care, huge classrooms and having to stay up until 3 am every night. When I got to Fontbonne, I was mistaken and for good reason. The faculty and […]

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Students writing for Real Life at Fontbonne are paid a small fee for each post by the university.