Posts tagged as:


Thank You to the My Former Teachers

Thank you.

I want to say thank you to every teacher who has taught me. You have influenced my life starting when I was four years old. You assisted with the transition from one grade school to the next and middle school to high school and you put in all of your energy to make sure I was ready for college. You have shaped the student I am today and you have challenged me in more ways than any other group of people in my life. By pushing me to new limits, I have been able to grow and develop. Although we may have had our disagreements and differences along the way, your teaching styles have allowed me to learn to work with people of different thought processes to accomplish the task at hand. You taught me how to do simple to complex math, write a sentence to write a paper, read a word to read a novel.

By putting the time and effort into your lesson plans, you have not only done your job, but you’ve impacted my life. From pre-school to high school, you and your fellow teachers have encouraged me to accomplish all of my tasks ahead of time and you have instilled in me the values of working hard and submitting what is my best work. As a community, you have worked with your peers to make sure you were sending me on to my next school prepared.

On an individual level, you told me what was working and what needed to be improved. You were honest when I needed to rework an assignment and genuine when my work was superb. The relationships I have developed with my former teachers are relationships that I plan on maintaining for many years. As I am currently diving into my collegiate studies, I am thankful for the teachers who have taught me simple tricks along the way, such as PEMDAS (Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally), times tables, writing checklists, reading responses, and many more.

So in conclusion, thank you for everything you have done for me as well as my peers throughout all of your years of teaching. Know your efforts are appreciated.


Your former student



Alumni Posts

New Students

by Alumni Posts on February 21, 2014

in Academics,College Life

The key to surviving college is to make a connection with your teachers! Your teachers have the power to give you an “A” or “D”. It is good to make a connection with them because you will be more comfortable asking them questions and that will help you to understand the work better. Another key to surviving college is TO DO YOUR WORK AHEAD OF TIME!! This is crucial if you want to stay on top of your grades. If something on a Wednesday but it is due on a Friday, do it on the day that you receive it and put it away. When you do this, you won’t feel under pressure to complete the assignment and you can sit back and relax while everyone else is biting the nails to get it done. This method also allows you to answer any questions about the assignment that you may have.


So I’m currently taking a course called “Introduction to Classroom Teaching” and let me just say, it has done nothing but confirm to me that I was meant to be a teacher. It delves into the psychology behind classroom management and the different theories of how the mind develops through a child’s school years. But it also has another aspect that has proven far more valuable to me: the “practicum” involves shadowing a teacher in their classroom at Brentwood Middle/High school. I was unaware of this when I registered for the class, and I don’t regret it in the slightest. Practically speaking, I’ve learned so much in just a short time watching a professional teacher work. More than that, it’s reminded me of why I first became interested in education: to pass the spark along. In my mind, there is nothing cooler than discovering a new way to look at a novel or uncovering a hidden layer of subtext in a piece of fiction. I’ve always admired the teachers who got excited for their job, and seeing this in the teacher I’m observing just makes me want to have my own classroom even sooner. If you’re considering whether or not the teaching profession is right for you, then I wholeheartedly recommend this course.


Hello, everyone!

I’m a transfer student. This is my third year attending college and my first at Fontbonne, and I gotta say, it feels so good to be part of a university again! Since the semester started, I’ve discovered a whole plethora of reasons why Fontbonne is the school for me. I’m having trouble just keeping track of all the little things that have impressed me so far! I could recite a whole list of big changes I’ve felt since coming here, but it’s the little differences that are usually the most profound. I’ll start with one that might not seem like a huge deal, but it means the world to me: people here remember my name.

Now, this might seem pretty commonplace to most of you, but allow me to explain. My name is Arjuna Ganim. It’s pronounced exactly as it looks. I was born in America, and I’ve lived in St. Louis all my life. The ‘j’ does not sound like ‘h’ ‘w’ or ‘y.’ English is the only language I speak. In fact, I’m an English major working towards a secondary certificate in teaching. I’ve been given several nicknames over the years. I suspect that a lot of people simply don’t care enough to put forth the effort t0 try and learn my name. Every time I meet someone new, I have to stand there and spell out, pronounce, and explain it for them. Let me tell you, this gets exhausting after the eleven millionth time.

For my first year of college, I attended a massive university away from home. You know when they say that you might end up being just a number at big colleges? They’re right.  My classes were all huge, making it difficult for professors to connect with every student. On more than one occasion I’d see one of my professors walking by on the street. I’d wave to him and he’d wave back politely, but he wouldn’t have the slightest idea of who I was or what was my name (much less how to pronounce it correctly).

That’s where the difference comes in. At Fontbonne, every single one of my teachers can recognize me by face. To them, I’m not simply student #465320. I’m Arjuna Ganim, and I can’t begin to describe how good that makes me feel.



by Alumni Posts November 8, 2010

Ok, so I’m gonna pull out the transfer student card. Back home, teachers didn’t much care if you did well in class or not. Here, when you see teachers every day walking around or just in passing, you can’t help but form a relationship. They genuinely care how you do and are more than happy […]

Read the full post →

Students writing for Real Life at Fontbonne are paid a small fee for each post by the university.