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Study Tips

“How do you study?”

I’ve been asked this question a few times over the course of my higher learning journey. The answer is always, “It depends.” On what? you might ask. Well, for me, the way I study depends on the class, my mood and surroundings.

The one thing that is constant, however, is my need for silence and order. So, I don’t study well in groups. The only exception to the silence rule is music. And, like I said, depending on my mood, my studying soundtrack could vary a great deal. You might find me listening to anything from the Beastie Boys to Beethoven or Mozart to Israel Houghton.

I’m kind of all over the place, to be perfectly honest. I don’t know if that’s such a great thing. Hmm …

Don’t get me wrong! I do take homework and studying seriously. I just don’t have a specific studying style. I could probably stand to be a little more grounded when it comes to that but, what matters most is that I understand the subject matter. Excellent grades are important to me as they provide a visual representation of my effort. Studying plays a huge role in getting acceptable grades.

I wonder how my fellow Fontbonne students get their study on?

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Good day, Fontbonne!

This week I wish to discuss how I study for exams. For me, the best way to study for an exam is paying attention in class. If you are unable to understand your teacher, then I would suggest dropping the class and getting into a new one. (There are some classes taught at Fontbonne with different teachers teaching the courses. Find one that works in your schedule.) Since I fortunately am able to understand my professors, I can usually give my undivided attention. What teachers say in class is very important. You can read the book all you want, but most likely what you will be tested mostly on is the information that the teacher has presented in class. There is a chance that you will have a class that does not use the book in class. It is always good to read the book regardless if the teacher does not review from it in class. For example, in my Western Civilization Pre-Historty to 1700 CE course with Mr. McCabe, Mr. McCabe tests his students on both the material that was given in class, and what was not touched upon from the chapters in our book. He will often say in class: “Make sure you read the chapter!”.

I have to admit, I do not always read everything for my classes. It is really only when it is mentioned in class that I read outside of class and homework. What has been working for me lately is studying my notes thoroughly, then skim the book for any information that I might have missed. Once I come across something that I realize that I need to know for the test, I read the section over maybe once or twice up to an hour.I feel that paying attention in class and taking good notes are the best ways for studying for a test. Good luck to all of you, and I hope that you have found my tips useful!

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Students writing for Real Life at Fontbonne are paid a small fee for each post by the university.