escort bayan escort bayan escort escort bayan escort kadikoy escort

Posts tagged as:

speech-language pathology

Hi everyone!

I hope your last week of classes is going well!! I wish you all luck and motivation to finish strongly!

It’s the end of the semester and academic year, so I’d like to recap a bit of my year to you guys (if you’ll let me)..

A few of the exciting things that happened to me this semester were:

  • I was able to go to NACA (National Association of Campus Activities) Convention in Baltimore back in February for FAB and ODK so that we would be able to bring back performers for campus!
  • At the End of the Year Banquet for ODK this past weekend, I was sworn in as Secretary of ODK for the next school year!
  • I also received the Exceptional Transition Leader at the Leadership and Service Awards Ceremony this past Saturday!

I don’t entirely remember many cons of this semester, so we’re not even going to acknowledge them 🙂

Next fall. So close, and yet so far away from where we are now. We don’t want spring to end because then summer comes around, and then we don’t want summer to end because then fall is here. But we can all agree that we don’t want to leave our friends for summer, but we won’t be able to wait until we get back for fall to see them all again! I am excited for the Fall Semester because I am finally starting to take a lot of speech-language pathology classes, and I have an art class to take as well. Oddly enough, all of my classes fall on Tuesdays and Thursdays, so on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, I am a free woman!!

peace out everyone,

Morgan

{ 0 comments }

Hey everyone! My name is Morgan, and I am back again to write some blogs for you to (hopefully) read!!

I am a sophomore (credit-wise a junior) here at Fontbonne, and I love it! This is my second semester writing blogs for Fontbonne, and I am very excited to write for you all! Since my last intro blog, not too much has happened… I’m steadily getting used to my spring semester classes, but I’m not sure if I will ever be awake enough for my 8 AM class on Tuesdays and Thursdays… OR will I ever be excited for my 4 HOUR BIOLOGY NIGHT CLASS ON THURSDAY NIGHTS. Now if you ask any of my friends, they are all probably sick of me complaining about my bio class, but to be honest, I doubt I’ll stop complaining all semester ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

I’m from O’Fallon, MO (not to be confused with O’Fallon, IL) where I went to St. Dominic High School and worked/still work at my local Baskin Robbins… You will learn that I take a lot of pride in my job at Baskin Robbins and that I love ice cream as one of my favorite foods. I’m majoring in Speech Language Pathology here at Fontbonne. Speech Language Pathology is when speech language pathologists help those with speech, swallowing, communication, and language disorders. Language is just so mind boggling to me because it’s one of the many ways that we can communicate with others. As I take more and more classes for my major, I am more intrigued and I fall in love with it even more!!!

That’s all for this week! I hope you guys come back and read again!

peace out,

Morgan

{ 0 comments }

Jacey

Beefy

by Jacey on January 30, 2017

in Academics

Quote

“When I was in high school, they used the word ‘beefy’ to describe someone who was muscular or really built. I’ve never heard it used in the way you’re using it,” my dad told me as I ranted about my classes for the spring semester. ‘Beefy’ is how my Language Disorders teacher portrays our text book. ‘Beefy’ is how the graduate students summarize three of the five classes I’m taking this semester. ‘Beefy’ is how my roommate, current undergrad speech-language pathologist (SLP) student, & alumni of our soccer team described my schedule to our soccer coach. So, with no accurate dictionary (or urban dictionary, for that matter) definition of the term ‘beefy,’ I’ve decided to explain the word to the best of my ability, using the context it’s been repeated in within the first few weeks of my semester.

When I first heard the word, I smirked at it. What a silly word. Beefy. Why can’t they just say “information-filled” or “educating?” I’ll tell ya why. They’re SLP students (and educators) with a wide vocabulary that like to play with words and their meanings and sounds. They have to be ready to explain anything in the most understanding way possible to any age. So here we are with… BEEFY.

I can understand, now, why it’s used to describe our Language Disorders text book. I just started the 4th chapter today and just took my first exam on the first 3 chapters (almost 100 pages, mind you) Thursday. Talk about an overwhelming abundance of information. Not only is the print on each page minuscule, but the information given in each PARAGRAPH is like taking in an explanation of how the earth was made. (Okay, not literally, but it’s a lot of information in a little amount of space). Each chapter is about 25-45 pages long. Your first question is probably “Do you actually read every word on every page?” Yup… I really do. Now you’re probably wondering “Your dramatic description of the book makes that seem impossible…” Although my description may be a little dramatic, I get the job done. Reading that many pages of any TEXT book is going to seem overwhelming and boring. With this text book, especially, I would not recommend sitting down and reading all 25-45 pages in one sitting. It takes me about 30 minutes just to read 6 pages (that’s not an exaggeration, I’ve actually timed myself before). So, prior to reading each chapter, I break it up. I only read 10-12 pages a day. This helps me digest the wealth of information I’m reading while also giving my brain and eyes a break! So, when one of you SLP students is sitting in Dr. O’Hara’s class & you get to hold “the Bible” as this text book has been referred to, don’t freak out. The hour and fifteen minute lectures will fly by, but when you get out of class & begin reading the text book, slowwww iiiitttt doooowwwn. Make the time to take things at your pace and digest all the details, statistics, & facts you’ve been learning about. (Helpful hint: BUY the text book.. DON’T rent it… it really is “the Bible.” DO read the chapters. DO the essay questions she gives you at the end of each chapter. And finally… BREAAATHE).

Now, my class schedule. Because I am a transfer student, my classes for my major (which, by the way, is speech-language pathology), are all kind of stacked on top of one another. Where other undergraduate students have to take the same classes, they are also spreading them out more than I am because they’re also taking care of their gen. ed courses. I got all, but one, of those out of the way in my first two years at a community college. So, as previously stated… my schedule is a little BEEFY. I’m taking speech science, fluency, language disorders, learning diversity, & physical science (there’s that one gen. ed). According to the graduate students I recently spoke with during a tutoring session (10/10 recommend taking advantage of the tutoring opportunities!!!!), the first three listed are some “beefy” classes. The roommate, current SLP undergrad student, & alum of the soccer team I was referring to earlier couldn’t believe I was taking all three of those classes in the same semester. All I really have to say about it right now is thank God it’s not soccer season. Fitting workouts into my schedule is manageable, but if I was having to miss classes for games, I would probably fall way behind, pull my hair out, & move half way across the country. (Kidding! I’d find a way to make it work). I hate missing class and this semester, I cannot afford to! So far, mind you we’re only a month into the semester, fluency and language disorders have been the “beefiest.” (There she goes being an SLP student, playing with words and adding morphemes where they don’t even make sense). There’s a lot of reading in those classes… granted fluency is a much easier read than language disorders, but still – reading is reading! It’s not so much the reading that is stressful, it’s comprehending what you’re reading that makes things a little strenuous. I take notes while reading fluency because we have pop quizzes on the chapters. This way, I have something to review and refresh my memory before class begins so I have an idea of what we may be quizzed over. I don’t take notes while reading my language disorders text. I underline things and also read the questions in the back of the book and write in the margins of each page where the answer can be found so that I’m prepared when she gives us the questions she wants us to know. It’s very helpful because then you don’t have to skim over page after page looking for an answer. You’ve already read it and found where it’s at! (And since you BOUGHT “the Bible,” you can write in it! … see how that works?) As for speech science, make notecards over every bullet point on every slide! I make notecards after every class. (Fun fact, you also have pop quizzes in there – be prepared!)

So… beefy. Beefy can take on a multiple of meanings from what I’ve gathered. For one, it means I’m busy. I’ve got a lot of meat on my plate (ha ha). I’ve always got something I should be or need to be doing. Whether it’s reading a text book or making notecards. I am never bored because of this… HA. Beefy also means informative, educating, detailed, enlightening… all that. Hence why “the Bible” is beefy. It’s like the book that you think is never going to end – and it may not, I haven’t gotten that far yet. The point of all this is, beefy can be an intimidating term when used in the contexts I’ve heard it used in lately. But it’s also a reason to work hard. Some semesters, students may find more difficult than others, and they are and they will continue to be. However, it’s not impossible. Mix in some time management skills, determination, study dates, & a couple naps with beefy & you’re nearly vegetarian!

Save

{ 1 comment }

The only organization I belong to at Fontbonne is the NSSLHA chapter. NSSLHA is the National Student Speech Language Hearing Association and is for speech language pathology and deaf education students. We do activities around campus including a bake sale and a trivia night as well as do social activities around the city. You will meet a whole bunch of wonderful people who are interested in the same things as you.

If you’re a deaf ed or an SLP student, I’d highly recommend the organization!! Along with being part of a great organization, when you have to pay ASHA dues, you get a discount for being an active member of NSSLHA during your undergraduate years. Being an active member also looks really good on a graduate school resume or a regular resume.

If you’re looking for a good organization at Fontbonne, then join NSSLHA!!

{ 0 comments }

One Major to Rule Them All!

by Alumni Posts September 24, 2015

I had no idea what I wanted to do when I first set off to college my freshman year. I didn’t declare myself undecided, but I had my sights set high on Biology and doing Pre-Med. I’d grown up wanting to do something like House did (you know, that show with the cynical doctor whose […]

Read the full post →

I Didn’t Choose Fontbonne: It Chose Me

by Alumni Posts September 17, 2015

I ended up at Fontbonne in December of 2013. Before that I had hopped, skipped, and jumped from school to school hoping to find the right place to settle and finally figure out what I wanted to do. Truman State University was my home for my freshman year and I wanted so desperately to return […]

Read the full post →

Mid-Life College Crisis

by Fontbonne University May 4, 2015

Last year, as a freshman I would hear professors tell me that it is common for people to switch majors in life at least once. I had not really believed my professors, in addition to my family members until that happened to me. When I started my college career I thought for sure that I […]

Read the full post →

PRAXIS PANIC

by Alumni Posts March 18, 2015

On Monday, I had the good fortune to take my PRAXIS examination. It’s the exam all students wishing to obtain licensure to become a speech-language pathologist have to take. It’s nerve-wracking because it’s expensive, and taking it again is a depressing prospect. You can take it as many times as you have to but you […]

Read the full post →

Taking Data

by Alumni Posts February 23, 2015

As a speech-pathology major, one of my profession’s greatest concerns is keeping track. By keeping track, we have the evidence we need to judge our work, to backtrack, or move forward, with different strategies, all to achieve a goal. For many speech-pathology majors, or any major that requires taking data, it is difficult to keep track […]

Read the full post →

Students writing for Real Life at Fontbonne are paid a small fee for each post by the university.