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Science

Sherry

The Best Stuff on Earth

by Sherry on April 9, 2012

in Academics

Do any of you remember the Snapple lady who declared that Snapple drinks were made from the best stuff on Earth? Maybe, you guys are all too young but I’m sure there is a YouTube video out there some where with her.

I bring up the slogan of the best stuff on Earth because I feel that way when it comes to all the classes that I’ve taken through Fontbonne. I am constantly learning each semester something new that will help me in a classroom. As challenging as some of my classes have been, I’ve always been able to follow along online with my textbooks, the PowerPoints that are given, journal articles, and the ability to ask my professors questions and get clarification.

I won’t say that all my classes have been my favorite, because I’m naturally more comfortable with courses that require me to use my writing and reading skills. I was an English major the first time around in college, and old habits never die. I know that I have personally used lots of techniques from my educational psychology classes, not only with my students, but with family. And that is a yes to using psych techniques with both my kids and hubby.

I think that the classes that challenge me the most are the ones that deal with math (not a personal favorite or best for me) and science. Over the summer, I had a class that dealt with speech and language development that challenged every fiber of my brain to remember details of the anatomy and why some children and adults have developmental delays. Wow — I never thought I could remember all the parts of the ear. The only thing that I knew was not to stick the Q-tip in your ear… no joke. But I learned not only the parts of the inner ear, but what specifically happens when these parts don’t work. I know that this class kept me on my toes.

The other most challenging class was last fall. It was a class to teach various testing techniques. At one point I was about to admit defeat over simple mean, mode, and median, but between my 17-year-old and 11-year-old helped me to keep going. Thank goodness for my children both excelling in math.

That brings me to another path on my journey at Fontbonne. My kids have helped their mom with learning to make PowerPoints, watching videos and making notes on PowerPoints. I know my son always wants to look through the PowerPoints to “learn something I didn’t know.” Gotta love that spirit.

I hope that you are having a great semester and feel like you are learning some of the best stuff on Earth.

Blessings- Sherry

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In the spirit of Thanksgiving, here are the top 10 things I’m thankful for at Fontbonne Unviersity:

1. My professors. They all care, and they all go out of their ways to help me succeed.

2. My friends. Some are my age, and some are older, but they’ve all helped to make my first semester at Fontbonne a great one.

3. The Science Department. Though the classes are challenging, they are all geared toward my ultimate life goals.

4. The student activities. Whether it’s listening to a live musician in the DSAC or watching eight students eat ginormous pizzas, there’s always something fun to do.

5. The community. I love walking around Clayton with my friends – it provides a nice bit of air and a great study break.

6. The Theater. Though I’m not a theatre major, I can still help out all the time in Fontbonne’s Black Box, and everyone there is grateful for my help.

7. The exchange program. This semester, Fontbonne isn’t offering the level of Spanish that I need, so the registrar signed me up for the appropriate course at a sister institution.

8. The library. It provides a nice place to study and relax, and the librarians are all more than willing to help me find what I need.

9. The diversity. I love going to school and interacting with students from around the globe. It’s so cool to see how much we all have in common.

10. “Learning More and Being More.” The slogan says it all.

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Courtney

The Mighty Research Paper

by Courtney on November 1, 2010

in Academics

RESEARCH PAPER.

I don’t know of any other 2-word terms that can frighten, bewilder, or just plain confuse so many people.

Whenever you think of a research paper, you usually think of one or more of the following: boring, too much work, too little time, too scholarly, too long, too much.

Yes, I agree that research papers require a lot of concentration, time, and, well, research. However, I would like to write about the chemistry paper that I’ve done in order show my appreciation to Dr. Thomasson of the science department, Ms. Peggy Muldoon of the Kinkel Center, and to all of the librarians who helped me along the way.

Because General Chemistry is a gen ed course, we have to write a research paper. Yes, I know that this sounds boring, but I actually really enjoyed it. In my class, we had to choose one chapter from our textbook and then focus on one idea from that chapter. I chose chapter 2, titled “Compounds,” so that way I could focus on the compound carbon dioxide and its effects on the environment.

After I chose my topic, I went to the library and checked out five chemistry books; the librarian laughed when she saw that I was checking out a book called “The Joy of Chemistry.” (Okay, I’ll admit it, I do tend to think of chemistry as a joyful subject. Just don’t go around sharing that with everyone!)

Whenever I had a question about the format of the paper, I could ask any of the librarians, and they were happy to help me. Whenever I had a question about Dr. Thomasson’s specific requirements, I either emailed him or talked to him in person. And, thanks to Ms. Peggy Muldoon, the writing specialist in the Kinkel Center, my grammatical errors were found and edited.

So, in the end, writing my research paper wasn’t so bad after all. I’m glad that I was able to have had the experience of writing a formal paper for Fontbonne. Now it’s on to my Theatre Appreciation research paper…

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