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French Court

Last night before bed, I watched “Marie Antoinette”. A few weeks ago, one of Fontbonne’s Faculty and Staff won the “best costume”, dressed up as Marie Antoinette. I admired her costume. She looked like she popped out of the 1700′s. When the name of the character she dressed up as was announced, I asked my friend: “Who is Marie Antoinette?” My friend looked shocked when I asked her. After many years of History Classes in grammar school and high school, I felt dumb when she told me who she was. Marie Antoinette was the Last Queen of France, married to King Louis XVI. The film “Marie Antoinette” gave a great insight about how life was like as royalty in France in the late 1700′s. I never really knew what life was like for the King and Queen of France, until I got to see “Marie Antoinette”. Although I have heard about Versailles, I haven’t really known about what King and Queen lived there. I was very interested in seeing the King and Queen live in Versailles. I had absolutely no idea who was the first and the last royal to live there. (By the looks of it at the end of the movie, King Louis XVI and Queen Marie Antoinette were the last governing royalty to reside in the Palace).

When I was browsing through the Jack C. Taylor Library at Fontbonne University, I was surprised to have spotted a movie about Marie Antoinette. (Just a couple weeks before I had no idea who Marie Antoinette was!) The movie was very good in my opinion; Kirsten Dunst did a very fine job acting as Marie Antoinette. The film enabled me to take a good look into what life was like for the Queen. She was a beautiful girl, but the movie did not make her look mean. Some think that Marie was a villainess, while other French people looked at her sort of how Americans view the First Lady, Michelle Obama. Marie Antoinette was dressed to the nine’s and had a handful of responsibilities and adjustments to make in the French Court. Although the King did the majority of the governing, the Queen had some power. It was very interesting to watch the changes of Marie Antoinette from a young duchess in the Austrian Court to the Queen of France. The next time you are at the Library, I recommend that you borrow “Marie Antoinette”.

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