Posts tagged as:

dogs

My family members would not be considered “animal people.”  My oldest and youngest brothers like to play with dogs, and of course we all love puppies and kittens.  But, overall, we are not prone to loving animals.  That being said, we do have two small dogs as members of our family.  Rather, we did have two small dogs.

My elder dog, Jack, died on Monday afternoon.  He was 10 1/2 years old—an elderly dog, but not yet ancient.  Jack was a black terrier-poodle mix; he looked like a lanky Scottish terrier.  He was docile in the company of family members, but fierce when faced with danger.  Which generally came in the form of a mailman or neighbor’s cat.  Unfortunately for Jack, he was not quite as big as the neighbor’s cat, and had to be dragged from impending altercations occasionally.

My mom noticed a few weeks ago that his behavior was atypical of him.  Usually a quiet, loyal dog, he would follow her around the house, hating to be separated for long.  The past few weeks, he spent most of his time hiding under beds or behind chairs.  Jack was losing weight rapidly and ate very little.  While I was home for Easter weekend, we took him to the vet to find a solution to his odd behaviors.

The vet found a tumor.  Needless to say, my Easter break was spent with much tears and deliberation of what treatment path to follow. Finally, a surgery was scheduled for Monday to remove the tumor if possible.   At first, the surgery seemed to be going well.  The vet was able to remove Jack’s tumor, which had been leeching the protein and nutrients from his body.  The doctor began to sew him up again.

The vet found another tumor.  This one was four inches, huge for the tiny dog.  The tumor was near his spine and large intestines and there was nothing the vet could do to save him.

We were devastated.  By Monday, we had assumed the worst but were hoping for the best—we ended up with the worst.  My younger dog, Jill, wanders the house looking for her best friend.  My mother and youngest brother cried, and I cried talking to them on the phone.  I learned that mourning a pet is similar to mourning a human family member; you will still feel the emptiness, the hole they filled in your life.  Like humans, pets can cheer you when you are sad and give you their company when you are alone.  Plus, they never say a cruel word to you.

Jack was a kind dog, and he was with us for many years.  It will be strange adjusting to life without him.  Even though I visit home less frequently now that I am in college, I will still half-expect to see him when I walk through the front door of my house.  Jack was a dog, but he was family.  I suppose my point in writing today is to remind you all to cherish the time you have with your family, friends, and loved ones.  Even the smallest members.

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Courtney

Puppy Time!!

by Courtney on February 2, 2014

in College Life

Who doesn’t love puppies?! If you’re not a puppy and/or dog person, then, I hate to break it to you, but there’s no way we could ever be friends. I’ve always been a dog person. I grew up around dogs, and I can’t imagine ever going through life without at least one by my side. That’s why I love Super Bowl Sunday. For me, it’s not Super Bowl Sunday – it’s Puppy Bowl Sunday.

For those of you who are unfamiliar, Puppy Bowl is Animal Planet’s alternative to the standard Super Bowl game. Adoptable puppies who are looking for their forever homes are allowed to romp and play with each other on a set designed to look like a real football stadium, albeit much smaller. Hamsters “control” the blimp flying overhead as penguin cheerleaders excitedly watch from the sidelines. A human referee makes sure all of the puppies are playing nicely and not getting into too much trouble. Meep the Bird tweets (both literally and figuratively via Twitter) to keep his followers up to date on all of the action as the dogs “tail-” gaiting in the “barking” lot cheer on their favorite players. And – get excited, cat lovers – there’s even a kitty halftime show.

This year marked the tenth anniversary of the Puppy Bowl, and it was great. Not only was internet sensation Keyboard Cat the star of the kitty halftime show, but previous MVPs (Most Valuable Puppies) who’ve since been adopted were “interviewed” so audiences could meet their new families and see how they’ve been doing since their starring roles in their respective seasons of Puppy Bowl. I’m still giggling over how cute all of the animals were in today’s Puppy Bowl X, and I can’t wait to see what happens next year on Puppy Bowl XI!

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I’m done. I have a calc test in the morning, but I can’t bring myself to study for it anymore. Yes, at about the spring break mark I start losing motivation pretty fast. The weather turns! I start running again! Who in their right mind would want to be working on applications of derivatives at such a magical time of the year? And anyway, if the turn of the season isn’t enough of a distraction, I have other things on my mind, as per usual, like the looming question of, “What am I going to do this summer?”

I remember fondly the night over winter break that I threatened to change majors once and for all. My father told me something about getting a job over the summer at a hospital (ugh) to up my shot at a dietetics internship, when I stubbornly announced, “Well, I’m thinking about changing majors, sooo…” (“So that’s not going to happen”, in other words.) And then, quite seriously, maybe three days after I made the Big Change, daddy told me that I needed to get a biology internship in a lab this summer. So I began the dreaded task of filling out online applications (does anybody else hate those things? I always find them so ambiguous.) to a couple of really awesome places that I figured I didn’t have much a shot with. Yes, my dad was convinced I had just as good of a chance at getting a spot at the Danforth Center’s internship as all of those other kids who probably have known all their lives they were destined to be scientists. So I applied. I kept looking around for more opportunities, and excitedly applied for a chemistry internship at Sigma-Aldrich as well.

The other day as I was happily (??) doing my calculus, my other best friend Elizabeth (who claims to be a blogger, but whatever) came in and told me about the interview process she underwent for a computer science internship at Sigma. That’s when it hit me: if I get lucky enough to interview there, it’s going to be hard. They’re not going to ask me to talk about a deadline I had to meet, or what my weakest personality trait is (in addition to hating online job applications, I also hate those types of interview questions as well. I suck at them.). They’re going to ask me super technical questions that may require a calculator. And scratch paper. And help from the Chemistry Gods; namely, Zeus, the dog who wrote my all-time favorite book, “Organic Chemistry”:

Don't let the human in the photo fool you.

I’m scared. I heard back from the Danforth Center several weeks ago about my status in the application process, but nothing from Sigma. Do I have a shot at it? Now that I’m finally starting to feel at home in St. Louis, I want to spend the summer here, as I think it would do wonders for my personal growth. At other times, I feel like it may be nice to lifeguard again. I like being outrageously tan. But living here, on my own…it would push me out of my comfort zone to a new degree, as I ‘d have plenty of time to explore and have fun and do the things I don’t have time to do during the school year (or feel too guilty to do).

I wish I had answers to what was going to happen! But until then, I wait, with my fingers crossed that it all works out for the best. I have a feeling that whatever happens will in fact be what’s best for me. I may not see it at first, but it will be (this is pretty much the story of my life this semester, no?).

Hang in there everyone! You can do it!

-Carly

“Soft” by Washed Out

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Here at Fontbonne, we have a “Fontbonne Day” devoted to service. It’s a day where classes are cancelled and students have the opportunity to volunteer for numerous community service activities. I did not get involved with “Fontbonne Day” last year, but I was quick to register for a activity this year and volunteer last Friday.

The day began early for me (8 am) with coffee and a quest speaker. After about an hour each group broke off and went to their volunteer site. There was everything from gardening, cleaning, preparing for events, and washing dogs. I volunteered for something near and dear to my heart: animals. My group went to Open Door Animal Sanctuary in House Springs, MO. It is a no kill shelter that is the home or temporary home of more than 300 cats and 100 dogs.

While at Open Door, I loved and comforted the new-born kittens, as well as groomed some of the older cats in their “Cat Heaven”. All the cats were really inviting, frequently brushing up against my leg or meowing for attention. The dogs were housed in kennels, and we had the opportunity to give them their exercise and take them for a walk. Although it was more of a glamorous volunteer opportunity, I still felt good giving attention and love to the animals that need it most.

After visiting Open Door, I think I’m going to go back a few times this summer to volunteer and donate. They are in need of food and other supplies for the animals. I might even make a cat blanket or two! I will definitely be participating in Fontbonne day again next year. A day devoted to service is truly a good day!

Thanks for reading..

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My Favorite Commuter Perk

by Courtney February 24, 2013

After a long day of physics, biochemistry, and molecular techniques lab, one of my favorite things to do is return home to my best friend, Cocoa Dixie, to take her for a walk. Being a commuter allows me to do that.

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