From the category archives:

New & Future Students

As a speech-pathology major, one of my profession’s greatest concerns is keeping track. By keeping track, we have the evidence we need to judge our work, to backtrack, or move forward, with different strategies, all to achieve a goal. For many speech-pathology majors, or any major that requires taking data, it is difficult to keep track while you’re in sessions. The multitasking is difficult, and the struggle is truly real, especially when you are bound by a code of ethics that requires faithful data collection.

But everyone does it, in a way. Figuratively, I think we all have a subconscious force in us that computes a tally. This tally can be anything; what makes us unique is our counting priorities. Not only do we count, we gauge progress based on the percentage we achieve. We all have our own “code of ethics” that guides us in making our choices to make our time count. Now, not everyone things in numbers, but we can at least count, can we not? Some of us count calories. Some of us count money. Some of us count how many times we make people laugh in a day. Some of us count how many times that cutie in class smiles back. Some of us try to count how many times that client produces the /k/ and /k/ in the initial position of CVC words in spontaneous conversations with 80% accuracy during unstructured activities given only semantic and verbal cues.

Hold up, hold up, Izzy… stop rambling. So what does this have to do with Fontbonne?

Being at Fontbonne has shown me that your time here really does count, qualitatively, and quantitatively. I cannot tell you how many great conversations I have had with the people here throughout my 6 years in St. Louis. From all of them, I have yielded little nuggets of wisdom I will keep, like Sister Rita teaching me, “There’s a world out there friends… don’t miss it.”. I cannot tell you how many random acts of kindness I have received or have witnessed students do for others (so whoever left that cookie in my mailbox THANK YOU SO MUCH!!!).  I cannot tell you how many times I have been on adventures with friends in spontaneous youth that have ended in the most meaningful experiences of my life, like the time someone organized a treasure hunt for me in Forest Park during a tough time. I cannot tell you how many times I am awed at how I learn so much from my other students, older and younger, like the amazing leaders I witnessed today during Selection Saturday, so willing and pepped up to take over campus with their positivism and enthusiasm.

It is not always about the number, but about what made that number meaningful to you. In other words, you are more than a number. You’re not just a statistic in the system. You can definitely trust that there is someone here who will make your time count more than you think, and you are also given the motivation to track your own progress as you are molded by the nuggets of wisdom you receive. For what it’s worth, I’ve already lost count!

 

 

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Hey Fonties! Hope you had a fabulous week. I can’t believe I’m almost a college senior! Time really does fly when you’re having fun. It seems like just yesterday, I was being fitted for a cap and gown for high school graduation. When I think about my transition from high school to college, I remember crying a lot (a lot….). I was at my highest point of stress that year. Anyway, after 12 amazing years in the district of University City, it was time to go and start over. The transition to Fontbonne was a lot more stressful than graduating from high school. Why, you ask? Because it was a completely new experience for me. I knew nothing and no one. I didn’t think I was going make it to my junior year at Fontbonne, but I’m here…. To the incoming freshmen, I have one major piece of advice: cherish your time with your friends while you can, because eventually all of you will go your separate ways, and then you will just have the memories.  Anyone who knows me well on campus, knows I love my lions. The amazing experience I had at U. City made the transition to a brand new place that much easier.  I can’t thank my U. City family enough for giving me the best 12 years of my life; I will be forever grateful.  Now all my Fontbonne friends know why I wear black and gold with pride and dignity — it’s only right!

 

P.S.  What time is it?…. U Time!!! Just passing on a little U. City spirit :)

 

Black History Fact of the Week: Malcolm X remains one of the most influential and complex figures of the modern era. His lasting legacy as a symbol of Black pride, intellect and bravado has sustained over the decades since his death. This Saturday marks the 50th anniversary of the great leader’s assassination, which silenced a voice that could have continued to be part of powerful change.

 

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High school, at least for me, was not that long ago. A year ago from this date, I was in my home town and attending daily classes as a Phoenix. So how did I transition from a Phoenix to a Griffin? High school attempts to prepare you for college academically, but it can sadly fail at preparing you emotionally and socially. It took a lot to get used to not being with the people I’ve been in school for years with. No matter how difficult it was, it’s possible and it just happens to be completely worth it.

Emotionally you’re a mess when you graduate high school, these emotions include positive and negative responses to this drastic change. For most people I think the hardest thing to transition to college is meeting new people. Like I said, you have been with the same people for years. It’s weird not seeing them everyday in the halls. However most of all, you miss your friends that you made. I personally had a close group of friends and leaving them was possibly the hardest thing to get used to. Transitioning into knowing so few people, but coming from a place that you knew everyone can be hard. So if you want to keep your high school friends, here are a few things you can do.

1. Forget distance as an excuse to be a forgetful friend

Distance is just a number; it is possible to talk to them still. Giving up on friends because of miles is like getting rid of a perfectly good car because it has a scratch. Facebook allows you to create a group chat and I’ve used it since I got to college. Whenever my friends and I are having a bad day, we message each other. Even if we are having the best day, we tell each other. The trick is to find tools like this one to get in touch with another.

2. Put yourself out there

This sounds extremely similar to dating advice and maybe that’s because it actually works. Dwelling on home will only make matters worse for you when transitioning to college. Dwelling on past friends and what you did with them will make it even worse. Yes, you may be starting over socially. Yes, that may be scary. However, it is totally worth it to meet new people. I love my friends at home and school. I wouldn’t give up them for the world.

3. Do not compare, you can have both worlds

Comparing old and new will just make you upset and ruin your fresh start! Never compare your home life to your college life, it will only make you feel scared. Of course home will seem cozier, but college is a brand new escapade. Don’t waste it comparing it to your life at home and during high school.

Speaking from an experience I just went through, transitioning from high school to college is hard. It can make you feel out of your comfort zone and you should be! It should feel like you’re not where you were before because you should grow into who you want to be. Two different worlds may be hard to handle, but I have a feeling your shoulders are strong enough to hold them both.

 

snowworlds

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It’s been a while since I’ve last blogged, but since it’s my last semester, I hope you will indulge me as I prepare for the next step. Yes, I am graduating in May! It seems very surreal, but so does the rest of my life. After all, I am grateful that I was able to start a new life here.

I am watching “Fried Green Tomatoes,” one of my favorite films about the friendship of two women in the 1920s and how their story empowers a housewife set in the early 90’s (I think?) to emerge from the barren dust of her marriage to strengthen her confidence in herself and in others around her. I watched this film with a friend here at Fontbonne, and it’s remained a favorite since.

Last week, I walked through the passageway between East and Ryan Hall into a group of international students. I met them at the President’s International Student Reception the week before. My mood was rather sombre and stressed, so I did not stop to speak, but I said hello. And wow, what a hello back I received! All of them saw me, and just yelled, “HIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!” in different timbres, pitches, inflections, languages… you name it! It was as if I scored a goal in a football match. I mean, a soccer match. I walked away laughing, out of my sombre mood!

Though I cannot relate to being a bitter housewife, I can definitely relate to being in a rough situation when I started here. It’s moments like those where I can stop and remember how amazing the stories and efforts of others from times gone by are, along with the friendships and support I’ve received here. I have really come to fry my own green tomatoes… and eat them too.

 

 

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Future Teacher

by Abby November 3, 2014

Fontbonne University offers a wide range of major and minor options – covering many different career paths. The path I decided on was education! I am pursuing a degree in elementary education in hopes of teaching second or third grade after I graduate. The reason I chose elementary education as my major is because I […]

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New Places, New Faces

by Abby September 12, 2014

My first few weeks at Fontbonne have been AMAZING! I am from St. Paul, Minnesota and transferred to Fontbonne this semester from the University of Minnesota, so I am a long way from home! I got accepted to Fontbonne last spring, was granted a generous scholarship, and then everything just fell into place! I couldn’t have […]

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Meeting Dr. Pressimone

by Sara September 11, 2014

I was lucky to meet Dr. Pressimone at the international students dinner on September 4th. As I came near the Wydown House, I noticed how everything was set up to make this dinner a welcoming experience. The flags in the entryway representing the countries, the tables in the front porch and the decorations inside the […]

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The Right University for Me

by Taylor September 9, 2014

“I bet this place is haunted,” My little brother whined as we waited in the hall outside the admission’s office to talk to my admission counselor. He wasn’t a fan of the arched doorways, marble accents and stained glass windows, but I sure was. The architecture was just one of the first things I noticed […]

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To the Future.

by Marki May 5, 2014

What I am looking forward to next semester is first off the fresh start. The chance to learn something new and fresh and have an opportunity to work well in it. I really like my schedule for next semester so I am happy to see what it will hold for me. I am also extremely […]

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City Museum

by Joanna May 5, 2014

These last few weeks of school have been a lot of fun. Fontbonne is trying to squeeze in all the last minute activities, and I am gladly signing up for as many as I can. Tonight, I and a few of my friends went on a free trip to the City Museum. Like I said […]

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Students writing for Real Life at Fontbonne are paid a small fee for each post by the university.