From the category archives:

Our Causes

What is my major?.

In an earlier post I stated that I am currently studying Family Consumer Sciences, which is designed to help individuals, families, communities and much more, but my major is a branch of FCS, specifically called Family Policy & Advocacy. Now I will be honest and tell you that I am still in the learning process as to what my major entails. I know that I will work towards improving the quality of life for individuals in a given area in which I will reside. Additionally, I will aid families and communities as a whole since each group is affected by one another in some way shape or form. I will strive to make a difference with family and social issues that are present in the community around me. Going off of Fontbonne’s description for Family Policy and Advocacy majors, I will “promote social justice and stand up for human needs and rights on local, national and global levels.”

I will overall do what I can to help those around me like I have already stated. I know that I have several Social Work classes ahead of me, since I have social work commitments, which is not as stressful as the job of a social worker, or so I have been told. I still have more to learn about what I am to look forward to in this field, though am very excited!

 

Why you chose your major?

Well to be honest, I was in a situation where I was forced to switch majors. I wish not to go into detail as to why I was put in that situation though looking back on it, I am forever glad that such events occurred. I knew that I wanted to help people and give back to the community, plus knew that I had to have a passion for what I would do for the rest of my life, and I love working with children. Though recently I realized that yes, it is a good thing I love working with children, though is it more of my maternal instincts within me saying that I hope to one day have a family? The more I thought on that, the more I realized that I would burn out very fast if I ended up working in a work environment that was with children day in and day out and then come home to a family with multiple children – I would one day soon end up not giving all of my love and attention to both sides of the spectrum. I would be doing more harm to myself as well as those around me because I would have reached a burnout level too soon. So I looked deeper and asked myself what is it that I really like about what I do when I volunteer? I love helping people strive for greatness through personal relationships!

What you love about your major?

I realize that I must be repeating myself in this post, but I love how I can impact other people’s lives through my time? I love the moments that happen between me and someone else in need, and how those moments of genuine time spent make life so worth it.

http://www.fontbonne.edu/academics/undergraduate/departments/family-and-consumer-science/family-policy-and-advocacy-major/

 

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While attending Fontbonne University, I can honestly say that I love living in a city that has several volunteering opportunities at almost every corner you turn, not literally speaking though. Growing up, I was taught to give of my time and talents to those in need, whether that is through my church services or girl scout programs, service projects, hospital volunteering, my youth group events that would go on during high school years, and much more. No matter what the event or occasion was, there was something to better give of my time and talents as well as learn from those who I helped.

Starting with grade school, I can say that I contributed more than 300 service hours to my surrounding community and increased that number even more going into high school by more than 200 hours. Sure those are big numbers, but numbers do not matter to me, it is those lives that you touch that matter. Which moving on to my college days which are current, I volunteer still even though my schedule has become more busy more than I would ever imagine. During the summer I volunteer at a Vacation Bible School where I have volunteered every summer since I was in grade school and also attended the event myself as a little one. Also, I used to volunteer at week-long Girl Scout Camps, where I would aide any leaders in assistance or even lead my own group to be honest. Sure I endured the hot temperatures and had lots of fun though sadly I have not been able to help out in that area for a while. Lastly, I love volunteering at Children’s Hospital, adjacent to Forest Park and Barnes Jewish Hospital whenever possible. There I have one-on-one contact with patients where I assist them with having someone to play a game with, running an errand to go get their favorite games, find movies in which they may enjoy and much more. It is a rewarding experience each and every time. I love having the opportunity to help those in hospitals or any other area and be helped in return with no expectations. The purpose is to build relationships with those around me in the broader community. Make sure to give a little bit of time each and every year to help those in need, it does not have to be through donations or spending large amounts of money, though rather give of your time. Time is one of the most valuable things we have in life.

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Students for Life hosted a movie night of sorts last Wednesday. The movie was Dead Man Walking, a critically acclaimed film based off of true events undergone by Sister Helen Prejean. Sister Prejean is played by the talented actress Susan Sarandon. Sean Penn plays Matthew, a convicted murderer who seeks Sister Prejean’s guidance.

I had seen the movie once previously, and remembered it as an emotional experience. I have had the “death penalty conversation” numerous times with close friends, family members, and teachers. It is always a touchy subject–of course, why wouldn’t it be–and it is not a surprise that so many people are unwilling to talk about it. At the very least, Dead Man Walking opens up the conversation and makes it virtually impossible to ignore.

Sister Prejean constantly struggles with her position. Matthew has asked her to be his spiritual guide, providing Sister Prejean with a moral dilemma. As you watch the film, you become more attached to not only Sister Prejean and her plight, but to Matthew. If you have not seen the film, you might be confused and surprised–how could you side with a convicted murderer?

I spent most of the film trying to decide my feelings. Where did I stand on the issues presented in the film? What would I have done if I were Sister Prejean? Would I have had enough courage to even meet with Matthew, to accept his calls? The only thing I was sure of when the movie ended was that I wasn’t sure. The death penalty is complicated. It is not black and white, but severely gray. That is precisely the reason why it is so hard for so many to organize their thoughts on the matter.

Among 32 other states in the U.S., Missouri has the death penalty. If you have not seen the film, I strongly encourage you to watch it and to start the conversation.

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We Are the Revolution

by Lauren on September 23, 2014

in Our Causes

These were the words uttered by a woman at the People’s Climate March, held on Sunday at Kiener Plaza.

I thought that this would be appropriate topic to talk about. Firstly, because it is always an appropriate time to talk about climate change and its continuing impact on our environment, on our world. Secondly, because St. Louis plays a big part!

I attended the March with my sister on Sunday. I didn’t know what to expect, since I had never been to an event like this before. We walked a few blocks and then we stumbled upon it, Kiener Plaza overflowing with people. Environmental issues, at least in my mind, always seem to be overlooked. I suppose I expected a few dozen people. What I didn’t realize is that the People Climate March is a big deal. It serves to bring about awareness and demands change–namely, renewable energy. Renewable energy comes in all shapes and forms, such as solar, wind, even steam.

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But perhaps the biggest connection I made while at the March was with a class I took at Fontbonne last year as a freshman. Culture and the Common Good opened my eyes to a lot of issues and reminded me to look outside of my own little box. So many people fear that they, as individual, cannot make a difference. Phrases I heard on Sunday were ones such as “quality of life” and “free will”, phrases that I also heard in class. It was amazing to experience like this and apply the knowledge that was instilled in my from Fontbonne!

At the end of the day, I had a smile on my face. I was a bit tired from marching, but ridiculously happy. It is amazing what we can do when we come together. We can improve our quality of life for ourselves and for others, in fact, it is our duty as citizens and advocates of the Earth. All we need is the will to do so.

And, what a brilliant thing to participate in something so close to home!

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Images courtesy of Caitlin Zera

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Help Yourself By Helping Others

by Alumni Posts April 30, 2014

Hello! Today, I am going to be sharing my thoughts on community service and its relevance to Fontbonne’s mission statement. • “Why is service so important?” Serving your community lets others know that you want to help change the world little by little while gaining a new perspective of life. Service, amidst being so important, […]

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A Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (JK, I’m Talking About COLLEGE)

by Alumni Posts April 7, 2014

If I were to give a new student advice on how to survive college, the first word that would come out of my mouth is, “God.” It is crucial to have a backbone of faith – in something. By having faith in our Lord, you will have more faith in yourself. When you have more […]

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Recycle ALL the Things

by Alumni Posts February 10, 2014

Remember how I said I was Environmental Club president? Well, it’s time to get back on my game and start shamelessly promoting some events. First, we have our annual Recyclemania campaign running from February 2nd – March 29th, so there will be periodic trivia and prizes for that.  Recyclemania is basically a nationwide competition for […]

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Exciting News for Spring 2014 Semester

by Alumni Posts January 23, 2014

Hello students and prospective students, I had a very nice meeting tonight with my colleague, Lottie Marie Page, regarding the “re-start up” of Fontbonne’s LGBTQ Alliance for Respect and Equality (FLARE). After having difficulty managing to run FLARE last semester, I have unfortunately decided to step down as president. Sadly, I did not do anything […]

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Why Compost?

by Alumni Posts November 26, 2013

Compost is the product that results after the decomposition of organic waste (certain food waste). This product can be used to make nutrient rich soil for plants to grow. There are two reasons why we should compost: 1. To avoid dumping tons of food in landfills. Americans waste 29 million tons of food every day. […]

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Work Hard, Shop Hard

by Alumni Posts November 21, 2013

Tuesday was super exciting this week… because it was Environmental Club’s shopping night at Rosemary Grove! Rosemary Grove is a great store in Kirkwood that sells Fair Trade items supporting both the local economy and developing countries around the world. We have a partnership with them – anytime you shop there and mention us 10% […]

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Students writing for Real Life at Fontbonne are paid a small fee for each post by the university.