From the category archives:

After College

So if you’re a senior like myself and are considering going to graduate school to continue your education in whatever field you’d like, you probably haven’t had a whole lot of direction.  One of my professors just came to one of my classes on Monday to talk about it and didn’t even answer all the questions I still have brewing in the back of my mind.  So let’s break it down:

  1. MAKE A LIST: Normally, I’m not a list person, I’m not going to lie.  But since it’s gotten down to crunch time to getting applications and transcripts and letters of recommendations and test scores together, I cannot stress this enough. MAKE A LIST. Thinking about applying to a few different schools? MAKE A LIST.. Order them by top choice to considering but unsure. Thinking about all the things you want to look at when looking into schools? Programs, location, cost, etc. MAKE A LIST. School’s websites normally have lists of things you need to send and to apply to school, but are you going to keep that page as your desktop background? Probably not. MAKE A LIST. Have a bunch of schools you transferred from and need to send transcripts to all the places you’re applying? MAKE.A.LIST. Seriously this will help you out tremendously and keep things kinda organized, okay? Trust me.
  2.  WRITE A PERSONAL STATEMENT/LETTER OF INTENT/ETC: I still honestly don’t know what these consist of but among the 4 or 5 schools I”m looking at, they require these to apply.  Check out the schools application processes and see what they’re looking for in these letters and essays.  Some schools are picky about it and some just want the general information. Who you are, why you want to do what you want to, and why you are looking at the specific program at the specific school. The professor who came to talk to us on monday in my class, whose in charge one of the graduate program admissions, said to stay away from cliche words like PASSIONATE, LOVE, WONDERFUL, EXCITING, ETC. Schools already know that you’re passionate about it or love it ok you’re applying to the program. This doesn’t mean that you can’t put your story about your grandma being in the hospital for a long time or what got you into art, etc, just don’t make it a typically store. What makes you stand out.  The OWL at purdue has some great advice for writing personal statements and there’s also great information for letters of intents here as well as tons of other sources you can find from searching it on the web.
  3.  WRITE A RESUME: If you’re applying for a grad program, some schools and even some of the professors you ask for letters of recomendation will ask for a resume.  The typical resume is about 1-2 pages. This website has alot of great information on how to write one.  The kinkel center can also take a look at your resume and tweak it to be perfect.  I don’t suggest following a microsoft word template of a resume because they’re sometimes hard to work it.
  4.  ASK FOR LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION: Most often schools require you to send them 3 or 4 letters of recommendation from an advisor or professor.  Most schools prefer that you ask professors in your program because they often know what kind of things schools are looking for to hear compared to a boss at a job or your favorite person in the admissions office.  When you go to ask, bring a resume to give them an idea of what kind of things you do outside of school as well as a stamped and labeled envelope for them to just put the letter in and send off. Easy as that!! Sometimes it’s nice to write them a thank you letter too later on for writing a recommendation.
  5.  GET STARTED EARLY: Don’t wait until last minute to apply.  Grad school applications can take several months to process so it’s better if you get started early on in the fall semester.  Take the GRE (which is usually required for most schools) in the summer before your senior year or August or September before things get busy.  Most applications require you to send everything in by December or January and at earliest, you can hear from them by April or March.  I’m a procrastinator like nobody’s business, but getting this whole process started in September was the best decision I ever made.  It’s early October right now and I’m almost done with everything! It’s such a relief.
  6. TAKE THE GRE: What is this even? It’s like the ACT of grad school. A pain in the butt 4 and a half hour standardized test that costs an insane amount of money. ($195). But don’t let that scare you.  Some schools don’t require it for applications, but most do.  Do yourself a favor and take a class to prepare for it or rent a GRE prep book.  They’re inexpensive and will help you out when it comes down to test day.  Sign up for the test date at least a month from when you start preparing.  I know this seems like too much time to prepare, but trust me, you won’t regret it. There’s never enough time to prepare for this.  Have your schools in mind for after you take it. It asks you at the end what schools you want to send your scores to and it’s free to send it right then and there after you take it.  It tells you that you can send your scores later for a fee, but I don’t recommend it.  It’s $27 per school. Ridiculous, I know. It’s not like going to school is taking enough of our money already…Anyway, the test center will provide the materials you need as well as a locker to put your things.  You’ll have a ten minute break to go to the bathroom, get a drink, or eat some snacks you brought. Good luck!!

I could go on with various tips about applying, but I think these cover the majority.  Applying is a scary and expensive process, but if you have everything organized and prepared, it’s nearly as not stressful as it seems to be.


When I started out at Fontbonne I had every aspect of my educational future planned out. I was going to major in Art, minor in Psych, and eventually go off to get my master’s in Art Therapy. Art Therapy is an up and coming career in the mental health field that uses art as a means of helping people with issues they might not have the spoken words for; it helps enrich the lives of the elderly and the mentally disabled alike. It’s a great path for someone that loves art and also really wants to help people. It was also a career choice that would be almost guaranteed to bring in a paycheck while I tried to make time to create my own art. After my first semester, and now into my second semester, I have had a slight change of heart. I fell in love with ceramics. Walking into the ceramics studio to create feels like coming home, and I don’t want to ignore that. So I will be changing to a Fine Arts major with emphasis on ceramics. I’ll be keeping my psych minor because I find it so fascinating, and it’ll give me more options for what I can do when I graduate if I need it. My love is art, my passion is ceramics, so that’s what I’m going to strive to do in my post-college life. Life is too short to work 9-5 in a cube 😉


My whole life I have always been passionate about writing in all it’s forms. From short stories and poetry, to essays and critical analysis I have always loved writing. While in high school I made the decision that I wanted to study writing in college. A majority of people thought I was crazy for this. I always enjoyed the various essays I was assigned throughout school that were loathed by most of the other students. Writing is just something that has always come more naturally and fluidly to me; it was my choice of self-expression. I began to think about possible careers to have that involved writing and the field of journalism always came up. I was fond of the idea of being a journalist but was never all too sure about it. Most schools have journalism programs all more or less focused on the same curriculum. Fontbonne does not have a journalism program, however, it does have a professional writing degree. Fontbonne was the only school that offered a more general writing degree that I was looking at. This piqued my interest because it expanded my possibilities that I could do with this degree. I wouldn’t be stuck in a program that I may end up not wanting to do with my life after all. Even if I have a change in heart in what direction I want to take my writing career I can still stay within the same degree. At this point I am still not sure what it is exactly I want to do with my degree but that’s really what the point of college is in my case.


Only one month left until school starts back up again. For me, fortunately it will be my last semester 😀 For dietetics students, our education does not end with a 4-year degree. After graduation the goal is often to land an internship or graduate school (or both) and then become a registered dietitian working in either the community, clinical setting, or in food service management. In addition to that, registered dietitians are required to have a certain amount of continuing education every five years. In the nutrition world, scientific research leads to a continuation of new information every day, so it makes sense to require those in the nutrition field to stay up to date.

For me, the continuing education excites me more than it scares me. I love staying up to date with the latest trends (even without following the trends, I like to know what others are up to so I can challenge misinformation). I’m looking to work in the community setting of dietetics because I love one-on-one interaction with people, and that’s where my heart truly goes. Although I love science and the clinical case studies in Medical Nutrition Therapy, I feel that there are so many current and future dietitians that have a huge passion for that area, that if given the chance, I’d prefer working in the community where my true passion lies. That being said, I’m open to new possibilities and am fully aware that internship/time may steer my choices in the dietetics world.

Fontbonne’s dietetics program isn’t for the faint of heart, it’s for the most passionate future dietitians out there! The instructors give you a great background of each different area of dietetics so you get a feel of where you want your career to land you in the future. My favorite projects included nutrition counseling with different clients. Once we did one with a registered dietitian role playing as a randomized client, another time we did with an actual client from Fontbonne’s campus. I can almost guarantee it pushed everyone in the classroom’s comfort zone at first, but it was a great way to learn!

For any perspective Dietetics students, I strongly suggest you talk to anyone in the FCS department and ask questions about the dietetics program to see if it’s the right choice for you. :)



The Search for a Master’s Program and Summer Fun

by Dani June 8, 2015

The summer has begun! For many of us that means picking up extra hours at work, taking summer classes if need be, and trying to squeeze a little fun into the long, warm days. My little bit of fun this year coincides with my search for the right master’s program. In the last three years, […]

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Forever Purple and Gold

by Alumni Posts April 20, 2015

It is truly hard to believe how fast the year is winding down. The number of student organization events, class assignments, and final projects is getting lower and lower. It is a very bittersweet feeling. I feel good knowing that I have accomplished so much in the past four years of college. But it is […]

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The Leadership Life

by Alumni Posts February 9, 2015

Over the weekend, I participated in what is known as the Leadership and Service Academy. This was a leadership conference for St. Louis area schools, and was hosted at McKendree University in Lebanon, Illinois. The day started with a motivational speaker, and then everyone broke off into groups to attend various seminars relating to different […]

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Senior Year is Almost Over.

by Alumni Posts November 17, 2014

My time at Fontbonne has gone WAY too fast. I transferred here with one goal in mind: work hard and get my degree. I didn’t know how my experience would be. This was my third time transferring to a school and I just wanted to get school over with. Fontbonne was more than that. I had […]

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What is next?

by Alumni Posts November 13, 2014

“What classes are you taking next semester?” I am starting to hear that more and more. It is weird for me not to have any classes next semester due to finishing up this semester. So much is happening to me both in school and outside of school. Becoming the President of the Residential Hall Association […]

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Dreams Becoming Reality

by Alumni Posts October 20, 2014

A couple months ago, an amazing opportunity came my way. I was offered to be the head shoes and accessories coordinator for St. Louis Fashion Week Fall 2014. As someone that is a fashion major and wants to pursue event planning, this was an absolutely perfect position and way to combine my passions. The past […]

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Students writing for Real Life at Fontbonne are paid a small fee for each post by the university.