From the category archives:

Academics

This summer is going to be off the hook! I have so many things planned.

May: Help with graduation, bridal shower, and go home for about two weeks!

June: Summer school (not that exciting)

July: Still summer school, a week in Mexico, Warped Tour, Mayhem fest, and Colorado

August: Still in Colorado, and then MY LAST SEMESTER OF COLLEGE.

I also plan on going to Six Flags and hanging out with my friends since I will be here in St. Louis majority of the summer! Im super excited!

{ 0 comments }

Carlyn

Dallas Days

by Carlyn on April 15, 2014

in Academics,Career Paths

Every spring, the fashion merchandising department alternates between taking trips to New York City and Dallas. I had the absolute time of my life on the NYC trip last year, so couldn’t wait for the Dallas one this year. It was a short, but sweet trip that lasted three days. This study tour landed during a very busy time of year, but the amount of information I learned, beautiful weather, and peer bonding throughout the experience definitely made it worth it. There were 10 students and two faculty members that attended (all ladies!).

The first day there, we visited the Dallas Market Center, which is where hundreds of showrooms are located. Many retail buyers come here from all across the world to purchase merchandise for their store. As a class, we were able to tour the building and meet with some showroom representatives for great Q and A sessions. In the evening, we spent time browsing the stores at the Dallas Galleria, then all ate together at an amazing Mexican restaurant.

Day two started out with a tour of the Mary Kay manufacturing plant. This was neat to see. I learned so much about their products and all the good the company does, making me a Mary Kay supporter now. Following that, we went to Mary Kay headquarters, in which professionals on the marketing side presented to us. There was a museum there too. The afternoon consisted of a visit to a company that works with pattern making and product development. Day two ended with more shopping in the West Village area, full of unique boutiques. Dinner that night consisted of one of the best pizzas I’ve ever eaten. My cousin lives near Dallas, so I had the opportunity to reunite with her that night.

Day three was the busiest, with no riding-in-taxis down time in between meetings. The entire day, referred to as “Career Day,” was spent at the Dallas Market Center again. This time, we listened to an inspiring motivational speaker and attended three educational sessions that were presented by a variety of professionals in the industry that traveled to be there. In addition, my trend board project was on display. To end the day, design students showcased their outstanding work in a fashion show. After that, it was already time to head back to the airport.

Everyone I encountered throughout the Dallas trip was extremely nice. They get the reputation of Southern hospitality for a reason. In a short amount of time, I saw a lot of new things. Trips like these are so beneficial to learning more about the fashion industry and what my niche is. It’s always helpful to travel and see what parts of the country I like best too. Last, but not least, I am grateful that I got to spend quality time with the other girls within my major. We created college memories that will be treasured forever.

At the Dallas airport with the class, as we depart back to St. Louis

{ 0 comments }

So… I’ve spent the first six months in 2014 trying to decide whether I wanted to do a thesis or not. In the graduate program for speech-pathology, this is optional, so we have a choice. I asked around; students who did do one felt incredibly gratified and fulfilled. Those who did not do one were happy they didn’t. So apparently it’s a win/win situation.

I’ve always believed that research is an integral part of any profession, especially in speech-language pathology. So much of our practice depends on current research. It’s a part of our Code of Ethics to consider future advocacy and evidence-based practice.

I sat down and came up with the following list:

YES THESIS:

  • Your resume is amplified by three thousand percent. Okay, well, maybe it just makes you look much more marketable.
  • It’s really fulfilling. God’s always on your side.
  • They open up areas you’d never dream about.
  • More networking opportunities because you work with professionals from different fields and different schools locally or globally.
  • Chances of getting a job increase.
  • You learn tons about gathering and conducting research.
  • People are more likely to take you seriously during and after working on said thesis.
  • You’re a foundation for future research.
  • You get to learn about something you’re really interested in!
  • Other issues are addressed through your research.
  • Major pride points when you’re done!
  • You get to present at conferences and everyone will offer you jobs (maybe.)
  • You may even get PUBLISHED.
  • You give others the opportunities to share in your successes (and non-successes).
  • Think of that Doctorate. Dr Liu? Yes.
  • You get great support from your advisors and your department.
  • It may be much harder to start if you decide to do one after you graduate.
  • More access to resources because you’re in school. Think of how many free articles you get thanks to the Library.

NO THESIS:

  • They’re definitely not as easy as they seem.
  • How will you ever decide what to do?
  • The Institutional Review Board is another process in itself.
  • Dat defense at the end
  • A doctorate really isn’t in store for you. Isabella Liu, M.S. CCC-SLP vs. Isabella Liu, PhD. M.S. CCC-SLP??
  • Funding is really hard to get. Both for the class, and for recruiting participants if you’re doing some controlled trials.
  • You’ll have to collaborate with other institutions if you need more resources.
  • Longitudinal studies are exactly what they seem… long.
  • You may have to start over from scratch.
  • You’re still in school and working jobs when you’re doing your research.
  • You have to sift through as much as you can of all existing research to compile your literature review, and not every 15 to 20 page article is going to be easy to read.
  • Outdated sources are still credible to a certain extent so you can’t automatically throw those to the side.
  • Your time will be eaten up by writing, writing, writing, reading, reading, reading…
  • You may not get a supervisor that’s always on the same page.
  • You reeeeaaalllllyyy don’t want to do one.

So… what do you think? It looks like the pros outweigh the cons. Some schools and departments make it a matriculation requirement, and I can see why. But when you have a choice, you’re faced with a tough decision that will eat up a lot of your time, but you have nothing to lose. I am reminded of the a quote from Albus Dumbledore of Harry Potter lore: “Soon, we must choose between what is right, and what is easy.”

Guess that pretty much decides it, eh?

{ 0 comments }

I knew going into the week after spring break that it was going to be the “Face the To-Do List I was Supposed to Tackle During Spring Break Week” week. Does that make sense? However I write it though, the week was, in a word, rough. And I loved it for that. Because weeks that make me feel super busy also make me feel super accomplished when I come out of them alive and in one piece. So yes, Physics Test Number Three, which I took the Wednesday night after break, was maddening and challenging (in other words…I genuinely enjoyed it, but my grade won’t) and I probably failed it. But like I texted my dad right after I took it, “I’ve just come to expect really hard exams now. They don’t really even phase me anymore.” (And neither does scoring less than a…50%…on said hard exams.). To which he responded, “I think you’re ready for Rolla :-) !” (Yes, he did type the smiley face because he claims he can’t get Emojis.)

Wait. Wuuuuut?

Oh yeah, did I mention that the moment I walked through the door to my house for my break, I kid you not, dad told me exactly how he felt about me pursuing chemistry? That I shouldn’t do it? That it’s not the best decision? That I need to do something else? (I’m so glad we decided to have this talk, wuuut, seven weeks before I graduate?)

I was angry with him. I cried about it. Dad and his stupid engineering mind-set* (*See definition at the end of post.)! Why did he have to be so disgustingly practical about everything? Why did he spend every moment of his spare time on his iPad, researching careers and salaries in chemistry to build his argument as to why I shouldn’t get a PhD or even a second undergraduate degree in it? Oh yeah, I was pretty mad all break. And then that Friday I went to UMSL and met with the chair of the chemistry department about completing my second degree there. And then I understood where dad was coming from this whole time. And, as of that Friday, I’ve had a nervous pit in my stomach, wondering how I’m going to make this decision in the amount of time I have to make it.

To get a good job in chemistry, I would do my second undergraduate degree (two years) before launching myself into a PhD program (five years). That’s seven more years of school total. Kids, to put things in perspective, that’s like high school and college combined practically. I love, love, love school and learning and studying (otherwise I wouldn’t do it so obsessively), but that’s a lot, even for me! And as dad so bluntly put it the moment I threw my backpack down when I got home that day,

“Then what?”

His idea: Take two and a half years or so to get my second undergrad degree in engineering at Rolla.

My take on his idea: Environmental Engineering with an emphasis in Environmental Chemistry. It seems like a natural fit for me…Right?

Hm. Maybe so. Next week dad and I are going to spend some quality time together as we make the trek down to Rolla to check out their program. Like he texted me yesterday, “I think you’re going to like what you hear.”

Hmmmmm…excited and nervous to see where this new road takes me…!

-Carly

En·gi·neer·ing mind-set: Noun: A very real personality trait that one knows best/everything about everything, simply because he or she holds a degree of some sort in the field of engineering, or is currently pursuing a degree in the field.

Example:

• Lately I’ve been especially obnoxious and smarty-pants-ish. I think I’ve inherited dad’s engineering mind-set. (FACT.)

{ 0 comments }

Humana Festival Trip in Pictures

by Courtney March 29, 2014

Below are some of my favorite pictures from my Special Topics theatre course focused on the Humana Festival of New American Plays in Louisville, Kentucky. This was definitely a trip to remember! Stopping to take a lunch break at an Amish buffet with one of my roommates, Angela, while on the road to Kentucky. It [...]

Read the full post →

A Spring Break to Remember

by Courtney March 29, 2014

Out of the four spring breaks I’ve had while in college, I’d have to say that spring break 2014 is, by far, my most memorable. Yes, last year’s spring break was pretty memorable; after all, it was when I took the GRE for the first time (yippee) and when I started my internship at my [...]

Read the full post →

Speech Therapy Observation

by Joanna March 24, 2014

This week I had the opportunity to meet with a private practitioner speech therapist. She talked with me about all the different places she has worked as a speech-language pathologist, and even let me observe a therapy session! I was super stoked because this was the first time I got to watch a therapy session [...]

Read the full post →

aRgh!

by Courtney March 16, 2014

Imagine a world without the letter “R.” Pretty hard, right? (That last phrase, omitting the letter “R,” would read as such: “Petty had, ight?”) It’s pretty obvious letter “R” is a vital letter in the English alphabet. And, as someone whose first and last names depend on “R” for that amazing connecting sound, I’m currently [...]

Read the full post →

Major oh major

by Tim March 10, 2014

My major, back when I was a little freshman, was to become a English teacher. My best friend and mentor Jeffery Facchin inspired me to do this. I was enjoying the knowledge that came with this major. I had a education class my senior year that changed my out look. I was starting to become [...]

Read the full post →

Under Pressure.

by Carly March 7, 2014

Tuesday night as I was at the checkout counter at Whole Foods, the cashier asked me if I had any exciting plans for the rest of the evening. Naturally, I did: “Meh, just a ton of homework,” I complained. “Oh yeah, it’s getting to be about midterm-time, isn’t it?” said he. Indeed. It. Is. The [...]

Read the full post →

Students writing for Real Life at Fontbonne are paid a small fee for each post by the university.