Deanna

#KONY2012

by Deanna on March 9, 2012

in Our Causes

Just a couple of nights ago, I got home late at night from work and I did my usual routine of checking my Twitter and then my Facebook. Repeatedly on Twitter I saw the hashtag #KONY2012. Naturally at first I assumed it was a new political leader in the running for the election this year… I don’t quite pay as much attention as I should, so it didn’t surprise me that I had no clue who it was. But with each tweet, there was a video link along with it. Because I was looking at Twitter via my phone, I couldn’t put headphones in and my roommate was trying to sleep, so I really didn’t want to wake her. I decided it could wait until the morning. After Twitter I moseyed on over to Facebook, and again saw the video linked on many people’s pages. It was everywhere, and seemed to literally be happening within that hour, because when I asked my friends about it they had not heard of it either. I saw a few pictures on Facebook as well.

KONY2012 is not a Presidential candidate. KONY2012 is a movement. A peace movement.

Over in Africa there is a man who is abducting children and forcing the boys to become his soldiers and girls to become sex slaves. That man is Joseph Kony. There is a lot more to this story, and it would make this a very long blog post… So I too will tell everyone to go to YouTube and type in Kony 2012, and please watch it!

It is 30 minutes long, and I understand that is a fairly large amount of time. But it is worth it! Everyone needs to know about this, and everyone must make Joseph Kony famous.

Tonight, over 80 people were gathered in the DSAC Cafe to watch this video and hear from a survivor of Kony’s war in Uganda, and also members of the Invisible Children. It was great to see such a large crowd, and proved that our generation is not as self-centered as the media sometimes portrays us.

Please, just watch the video and see what you can do to help others.

Other Links:
www.Kony2012.com
www.InvisibleChildren.com

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