Alumni Posts

Where’s an Inhibitor When I Need One?

by Alumni Posts on March 16, 2012

in Academics

I took my fourth test of the week yesterday.  It was a genetics test on operons, Darwin, cAMP (cyclic adenosine monophosphate, not camp as in “summer camp”), and everything in between.  I was so exhausted that I thought I’d come home and fall asleep as soon as I hit the pillow.  But I didn’t.

As always, my mind began to wonder as I lay down to sleep.  I began to think about all of the questions on the genetics test that confused me.  (I’m still confused about how a leucine zipper doesn’t cause dimerization…)  Then, I began to think about last night’s organic chem lab and about the potential reasons why my product  didn’t crystallize as well as my friend and fellow blogger Carly’s product.  Then, I began to think about what I should do over spring break besides studying for my upcoming organic chemistry test and writing my last close reading of literature paper for my theatre course, Oral Interpretation of Literature.

My mind wasn’t done wondering.  I thought that turning on my nature sounds seascape machine would help, but then I started thinking about genetics again.  In genetics, we learned that bacterial operons, which function in producing proteins, can be under positive or negative control.  I got into some really, may I say, “deep” metaphors involving my wondering brain and operons.  I wondered, “My thoughts are pretty much under positive control because they are always active (as in the activator), so I need an inhibitor to slow my thoughts down.”

And then I thought, “Wow.  I’m a nerd.  Time to sleep.”

I genuinely hope that I and everyone else at Fontbonne can enjoy some mental inhibition over spring break that way we can come back to school refreshed and ready to continue with the semester.  Have a great, safe break, everyone!!

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Students writing for Real Life at Fontbonne are paid a small fee for each post by the university.